Archive for the ‘Marine transportation system’ Category

NOAA Coast Survey, Coast Guard, and Army Corps of Engineers schedule public “listening sessions”   3 comments

Over the past few decades, mariners have witnessed the rapid development, reliability, and availability of e-navigation components, such as the global positioning system (GPS) and electronic chart display and information systems (ECDIS). These systems, and other technology, have fundamentally changed mariners’ reliance on traditional navigation services. In addition, the ability to manage data and information provided to the mariner through the automatic identification system (AIS) and cellular service has enhanced the interconnectivity between shore side information providers and shipboard users. These technological advances and data flow will help the mariner receive data, transmit data, and generally improve bridge resource management, situational awareness, and navigational safety.

These fundamental changes present the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey with an opportunity to take the next steps in modernizing federal navigation services. Technology development compels these federal agencies to optimize the current aids to navigation, other maritime information systems, and nautical charting.

We want to hear from you, as we develop a federal development portfolio that will provide coordinated and timely delivery of navigational information and services. We invite you to attend one of our listening sessions, to tell us your emerging requirements for navigational information and service delivery systems in an eNAV environment.

  • Juneau, Alaska:  1 May, 1600-1700 hrs, Prospector Hotel
  • New Orleans, Louisiana:  7 May, 0900-1130 hrs, Port of New Orleans Auditorium
  • Honolulu, Hawaii:  19 May, Harbor View Center, 1129 N. Nimitz Hwy.
  • Fort Lauderdale, Florida:  22 May, 1700-1900 hrs, Embassy Suites, 110 SE 17th St.
  • Hampton Roads, Virginia:  22 May, 1700 hrs, Renaissance Hotel and Waterfront Conference Center, 425 Water St., Portsmouth
  • Boston, Massachusetts:  3 June, 1000-1200 hrs, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, 55 Broadway, Cambridge
  • Seattle, Washington:  3 June, 1800-2000 hrs, Downtown Seattle Public Library
  • New York, New York:  10 June, 1000-1200 hrs, Alexander Hamilton U.S. Customs House, 1 Bowling Green, Manhattan
  • Oakland, California: 10 June, 1800-2000 hrs, Oakland Marriott, 1001 Broadway
  • Port Huron, Michigan:  12 June, time 1700 hrs, Double Tree Hotel, 800 Harker St.
  • Long Beach, California, 17 June, 1800-2000 hrs, Hyatt Regency Long Beach (Shoreline Ballroom), 200 South Pine Ave
  • St. Louis, Missouri:  18 June, 0900-1100 hrs, USACE National Great Rivers Museum (adjacent to the Melvin Price Locks and Dam, in Alton, Illinois)

The Coast Guard is also developing an online survey tool for public comments. It will be available on or about 15 June.

Use the response box below to let us know if you want more information about any or all of the sessions.

NOAA navigation response teams improve charts for ships transiting Miami and San Francisco   Leave a comment

Coast Survey’s navigation response teams, which are 3-person hydrographic survey teams on small boats, have made a fast start on this year’s survey season.

In Florida, where Coast Survey is preparing to issue a “new and improved” Miami Harbor Chart 11468 to alleviate vessel congestion at the Port of Miami, a navigation response team finished final hydrographic surveys to ensure the new chart has the latest and most accurate depth measurements around several areas identified as critical within the port. In just ten days, team members Erik Anderson, James Kirkpatrick, and Kurt Brown acquired, processed, and submitted the multibeam survey data covering 64 nautical miles.

NRT2 Miami survey

NOAA Navigation Response Team 2 just finished up this survey in Miami

The Biscayne Bay Pilots and others requested the new chart, which is reconstructing old charts in order to provide large-scale coverage of the entire precautionary area where vessels congregate to await pilotage and commit to an approach course to the channel. Updating the chart information and expanding chart coverage will alleviate a navigation safety risk for the world’s busiest cruise port, and will protect endangered coral reefs from inadvertent anchorages.

One interesting side note on the Miami survey… The team found a sunken car, which a Miami Police Department Marine Patrol/Underwater Recovery Detail dive team subsequently investigated. It appears to have been there for approximately 20 years, divers said. We understand they retrieve around 50 cars a year, but have never seen one this old. They plan to raise it later this month. Any bets on make and model?

NOAA navigation response team found this submerged auto at PortMiami

NOAA Navigation Response Team 2 found this submerged auto at Port of Miami

Meanwhile, in San Francisco Bay, another navigation response team is planning a special hydrographic survey to update NOAA charts 18656 and 18657. The action comes as a follow up to a July 2013 grounding by a tug and a barge carrying 80k barrels of crude oil in Benicia Anchorage 22, near Carquinez Strait, San Francisco. After the accident, team members Laura Pagano, Ian Colvert, and Edmund Wernicke conducted a reconnaissance hydrographic survey to determine if an uncharted obstruction caused the grounding. The survey determined that shoaling was the culprit and the evidence indicated that a charted shoal has been creeping through the Benicia Anchorages towards the federal shipping channel at Carquinez Strait. Last month, the U.S. Coast Guard requested an extensive survey to determine the extent and significance of shoaling in the Benicia Anchorages, and the team is planning to conduct the survey shortly.

NRT6 survey

NOAA Navigation Response Team 6 conducted a recon survey of area where a tanker barge went aground

NOAA navigation manager Gerry Wheaton suspects heavy sediment runoff from rains over the years have altered the sea floor in navigable areas near the Strait. While the initial NOAA recon survey provided information to notify mariners of the dangers, conducting a full bottom survey to update NOAA nautical charts will provide additional detailed depth information necessary to safely navigate the area.

Great Lakes mariners get new NOAA nautical chart for St. Mary’s River   Leave a comment

Vessel operators transiting St. Mary’s River, between Lake Superior and the lower Great Lakes, have a new nautical chart to help lessen the dangers inherent in this narrow and complicated waterway. The first edition of Chart 14887 (St. Marys River – Vicinity of Neebish Island) is available this week as a paper print-on-demand chart, PDF, and raster navigational chart. The electronic navigational chart will be available by March, in time for the beginning of the shipping season. (UPDATE, 2/12/14: NOAA ENC US5MI50 is now available.)

Coast Survey has built the chart from original sources, providing the highest standard of accuracy for hydrographical and topographical features and aids to navigation. The chart provides large-scale (1:15,000) coverage of the up bound and down bound channels of the St. Mary’s River – one of the busiest waterways in the nation. Over 4,100 transits of commercial and government vessels move about 75 million tons of cargo through the 300-day shipping season.

Corrected shoreline, chart 14883

The red lines show the shoreline as depicted before the updates. NOAA cartographers are applying the corrected shoreline and feature positions to the new chart and new editions of current charts in the Great Lakes.

Chart 14887 uses updated shoreline data, collected with NOAA’s high tech remote sensing planes. (See National Geodetic Survey’s shoreline data viewer.) At the 1:15,000 scale, the positions of many of the features were corrected an average of ten meters from positions in prior charts, a vital correction for precision navigation by vessels that can exceed a thousand feet long.

Coast Survey also plans to issue new editions of the current four largest scale charts of the St. Mary’s River in late January. Charts 14882, 14883, 14884 and 14962 will have all new shoreline, updating the locations of features and aids to navigation. These updates for the St. Mary’s River follow 21 new editions for Great Lakes charts from Buffalo to Thunder Bay Island, around the Lower Peninsula to Milwaukee Harbor and Ludington. More updates are slated for 2014 and 2015.

Chart 14887 was compiled by Nathan Burns and reviewed by Laurie Bennett, under the direction of Marine Chart Division branch chief Andy Kampia.

Iron ore shipment on Lake Superior

Updates to NOAA’s Great Lakes nautical charts will benefit ships like this one, carrying iron ore on Lake Superior. Photo courtesy of Carolyn St. Cyr.

NOAA and Coast Guard release Cooperative Maritime Strategy   Leave a comment

NOAA and the U.S. Coast Guard recently released the Cooperative Maritime Strategy developed by the two agencies. The introduction to the document, signed by Admiral Papp and Dr. Lubchenco, is a stirring testament to our shared legacy and commitment. We reprint that introduction here.

25 February 2013

USCG-NOAA Cooperative Maritime Strategy

We are pleased to promulgate our Nation’s first-ever Cooperative Maritime Strategy between the United States Coast Guard and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. For over 200 years, our Services have stood in partnership on maritime resilience, environmental sustainability, and scientific research. Indeed, America is a maritime nation, and the oceans, coasts, rivers and Great Lakes are the lifeblood of our economy. The maritime commons promote economic growth, advance technology, and challenge the human spirit. Our Services share a legacy and are committed to a future that honors our responsibilities as stewards of the oceans.

The Father of the Revenue Marine, Secretary Alexander Hamilton once said, “There is a certain enthusiasm in liberty, that makes human nature rise above itself, in acts of bravery and heroism.” Not only is our shared legacy marked in a vision for maritime excellence, but also in front-line acts of courage and inspiration. From rescuing survivors in unforgiving regions like the Arctic since the mid-1800s, to flying through hurricanes today to collect data, our men and women have served America with distinction for over two centuries.

This strategy builds on our legacy and establishes an integrated and coherent course for the future. Moving forward, we will continue partnering to promote a safe and sustainable marine environment, enhance collaboration in the Arctic and Gulf Coast regions, and foster innovation in science and technology. Perhaps most strategic, our Services will build on existing programs to inspire our Nation’s youth academically in the areas of science, technology, mathematics, and marine environmental protection. We will implement this strategy pragmatically and mindful of the fiscal challenges we currently face. It provides a solid vision and is the North Star for our future.

Robert J. Papp, Jr.
Admiral, U.S. Coast Guard
Commandant of the Coast Guard

Dr. Jane Lubchenco
Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans
and Atmosphere, and NOAA Administrator

What is the future of e-Navigation? CMTS wants to hear from you   3 comments

The U.S. Committee on the Marine Transportation System, a federal inter-agency partnership that develops national MTS policy, is asking for your ideas on the future of e-navigation.

They’ve set up a unique online site to facilitate the conversation, and they invite anyone with an interest in the U.S. marine transportation system to join the discussion. (Deadline for comments is February 28.) For background, you might want to read the committee’s e-Navigation Strategic Action Plan.

DSC_0049As defined by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), e-navigation is “the harmonized collection, integration, exchange, presentation, and analysis of maritime information onboard and ashore by electronic means to enhance berth-to-berth navigation and related services for safety and security at sea and protection of the marine environment.”

The committee’s e-Navigation Integrated Action Team will consider your comments as they develop their work plan and recommendations. They will also provide an analysis of all of the feedback this spring or early summer.  We will let you know when the analysis is posted, or you can monitor the CMTS website.

Join the U.S. e-navigation conversation at http://enav.ideascale.com

The CMTS Integrated Action Team leads for e-navigation are NOAA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the U.S. Coast Guard. Participating agencies are:

  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  • National Transportation Safety Board
  • Oceanographer of the Navy
  • Research and Innovative Technology Administration
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
  • U.S. Coast Guard
  • U.S. Maritime Administration
  • U.S. Transportation Command
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