Coast Survey prepares to serve nation during 2018 hurricane season

“But, sir, what does the country want in the coast survey? They want a very useful work done, a very important work done, and they want it done in the best manner.” U.S. Senator John Davis (MA), 1849, explaining the importance of the coast survey to safety and the U.S. economy during the 30th Congress, 2nd Session

As the nation’s nautical chartmaker, NOAA Coast Survey provides critical emergency response information to coastal communities and waterways. Each year, Coast Survey prepares for hurricane season in order to perform the work in—as the late Senator Davis put it—“the best manner.” Last year’s string of powerful hurricanes underscored the importance of coordinated efforts for storm preparation, response, and recovery. With the official start of the 2018 hurricane season just around the corner, Coast Survey’s regional navigation managers spent the large part of April and May meeting with U.S. Coast Guard (USCG), port authorities, NOAA National Weather Service, and communities to prepare emergency response capabilities.

Understanding each others’ roles and responsibilities ahead of time is imperative to a response effort as strong storms can shut down ports and compromise our nation’s marine transportation system. Our East Coast and Gulf Coast navigation managers report on NOAA’s survey capabilities and critical assets at hurricane exercises and planning meetings. With Coast Survey’s expertise in underwater detection, NOAA navigation response teams and survey ships are often first on the water following a hurricane, making sure that no hidden debris or shoaling pose dangers to navigation.

Tim Osborn (left), the navigation manager for the east Gulf Coast, Dr. Neil Jacobs (center), Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and Prediction
Tim Osborn (left), the navigation manager for the east Gulf Coast, Dr. Neil Jacobs (center), Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and Prediction, prepare to interact with attendees of the Hurricane Awareness Tour in Lakeland, Florida. Credit: Tim Osborn

This year, NOAA navigation managers participated in hurricane exercises in:

  • Texas: Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Houston/Galveston/Freeport
  • Louisiana: Port Charles, Port Fourchon
  • Alabama: Orange Beach
  • Florida: Lakeland, Tampa, Port Canaveral
  • Georgia: Savannah
  • South Carolina: Charleston
  • Virginia: Hampton Roads
  • Maryland: Baltimore
  • Pennsylvania: Delaware River and Bay (Philadelphia port complex)

Meetings are planned with USCG Sector San Juan staff as well as Puerto Rico South Coast Harbor Safety and Security in early June.

NOAA's southeast navigation manager, Kyle Ward (left) meets with USCG, Port Authority and other representatives of the Maritime community at the pre-hurricane meeting hosted at Port Canaveral, Florida.
NOAA’s southeast navigation manager, Kyle Ward (left) meets with USCG, Port Authority and other representatives of the maritime community at the pre-hurricane meeting hosted at Port Canaveral, Florida.

Additionally, Tim Osborn, the navigation manager for the east Gulf Coast, Alan Bunn, the navigation manager for the west Gulf Coast, and Lt. Cmdr. Jay Lomnicky, chief of Coast Survey’s Navigation Response Branch, recently participated in the Gulf Inland Waterways Joint Hurricane Team (JHT) meeting. This large Gulf-wide event held each year at the Port of New Orleans includes USCG, tug and tow industry, pilots, deep draft navigation, ports, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and NOAA partners from Brownsville, Texas, spanning east to Panama City, Florida. Each participant is a working member of the JHT for the current hurricane season.

Alan Bunn (center), the navigation manager for the west Gulf Coast, and Lt. Cmdr. Jay Lomnicky (right), chief of Coast Survey’s Navigation Response Branch, attend a presentation by the USCG at the Gulf Inland Waterways Joint Hurricane Team meeting. Alan Bunn was presented with a Command Coin from USACE Galveston, in recognition thanks for his efforts, and that of OCS, in the Hurricane Harvey Response.
Alan Bunn (center), navigation manager for the west Gulf Coast, and Lt. Cmdr. Jay Lomnicky (right), chief of Coast Survey’s Navigation Response Branch, attend a presentation by the USCG at the Gulf Inland Waterways Joint Hurricane Team meeting. Alan Bunn was presented with a Command Coin from USACE Galveston, in recognition for his efforts, and that of OCS, in the Hurricane Harvey response. Credit: Tim Osborn

Capt. Jim Crocker, chief of NOAA’s Navigation Services Division, and Kyle Ward,  navigation manager for the Southeast Coast, participated in a USCG District 7 workshop in Miami, Florida, to discuss the region’s readiness for the upcoming hurricane season. District 7 is responsible for six regionally-based sectors stretching from Charleston, South Carolina, to Key West, Florida, and Saint Petersburg, Florida, to the U.S. Virgin Islands. Last year, each of these sectors was impacted by either Hurricane Irma, Hurricane Maria, or both storms. Hydrographic survey vessels operated by NOAA and the USACE are considered critical assets to the USCG.

When severe weather isn’t heading for the coast, NOAA navigation managers work directly with pilots, mariners, port authorities, and recreational boaters to help identify navigational challenges facing the marine transportation system, and provide the resources and services that promote safe and efficient navigation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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